The Modern CMO: Part Art, Part Science and Part Religion

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It is the art of marketing that has made “Got Milk?” and “Just Do It” among some of the most recognizable campaigns of our time. Why? Because we related to them in the way we live our everyday lives. But as much as art and creativity remains an important factor for CMOs – and great brands will always remain fresh in our minds – the line between marketing art and marketing science are quickly blurring. Being the Don Draper of marketing is no longer the most revered marketing talent. Top leaders in marketing are good at both the art and the science of marketing. They deploy powerful technologies, like analytics, to build long-term strategies, deliver value to their business and ultimately guide them toward marketing success.

We all took note when the Harvard Business Review declared that being a “data scientist” is the sexiest job of the century. But what’s the correlation between data scientists and marketers?

We know that data scientists are the data ambassadors through whom we understand information. They are subject matter experts who direct and provide mentoring to others in the organization who want to interact with data, right? Not true!

It turns out that data science and analytics has made its way into marketing. In a recent study carried by OMI, Fortune 500 companies and global agencies identified analytics as the largest talent gap in digital marketing.

In some organizations, the need for analytics has gotten so critical that they are hiring a Chief Marketing Technologist. Last year, Gartner reported that 72 percent of high-tech marketing teams indicated there was a “chief marketing technologist” type role in their organization. These individuals, among other things, use behavior-based data to identify best sales opportunities and improve brand awareness.

So there is the art and science of marketing, but where does that leave us with religion?

Creating an important role for analytics is one thing, but practicing an analytic agenda is another. Only the most analytically-religious marketers extract real value from big data and analytics.

In the latest edition of the CMO Survey, more than 400 CMOs said they expect to increase their spending on marketing analytics by 72 percent over the next three years, but even though marketers are allocating more money to analytics, only a few are using analytical insights to measure marketing ROI.

Modern CMOs pair up with CIOs or hire analytic talent within their teams to shift the organizations’ behavior. They study their competencies, customers and competition religiously. They use analytics to align the rest of the C-suite to look at growth factors and to reposition the company toward higher meanings, goals and aspirations.

So while many people often emphasize one trait over the other, today’s modern CMO strategically blends art, analytics and marketing religion to execute campaigns and strategies built to deliver results.

This article originally appeared in Contact Center Analytics Review.

Is Hadoop Knowledge a Must-Have for Today’s Big Data Scientist?

big data businessFinding data scientists and other highly technical resources that understand the complexity of big data is one of the most common roadblocks to getting value from big data. Typically, these resources need to understand Hadoop and new programming methods to read, manipulate and model big data.

As big data analytics tools advance, addressing these technologies will become less difficult, so big data scientists must master additional skills.

To make a real business impact, data scientists must have:

1. Innate analytical skills
They must have a natural curiosity for experimenting with data and often begin analysis without a clear picture of the end goal. This is a different paradigm than solving a specific, identified problem through coding or by running a query.

2. Business finesse
Sexy dashboards ultimately fail if a business doesn’t act on what the data is indicating. To succeed, data scientists must know how to translate the impact of their insights to the business.

3. Collaboration skills
Teamwork and the ability to collaborate across an organization separate those who use data to drive change from those who merely build interesting algorithms.

Big data advancements have brought technologies such as Hadoop to democratize big data to all. However, individuals skilled at data manipulation and programming in Hadoop remain scarce. Fortunately, new, innovative and easy to use big data discovery applications have broaden big data access to those without much technical skills.

So the question is: Will these new types of discovery applications for big data demand a different kind of data scientist going forward – one with analytical, interpersonal and business skills? Or would in-depth understanding of emerging technologies such as Hadoop continue to be the most important skills in ‘data scientists’?

– Farnaz Erfan, Product & Solution Marketing, Pentaho

This blog was originally posted on SmartData Collective.

How Predictive Analytics Saved Tesla?

tesla-model-s-officialIn the last couple of weeks the feud between The NY Times Editor, John Broder – and Tesla Motors’ CEO, Elon Musk has played out in the media.

It all started when Broder took a highway trip between Washington D.C. and Boston, cruising in Tesla’s Model S luxury sedan. The purpose of the trip was to range test the car between two new supercharging stations. This 200 miles trip was well under the Model S’s 265-mile estimated range. But nonetheless the trip was filled with anxiety for Broder. Fearful of not reaching his charging destination, he had to turn off the battery-draining amenities such as radio and heater (in a 30 degree weather) to finally reach his destination – feet and knuckles “frozen”.

In rebutting Broder’s claims, Tesla’s chief executive, Elon Musk, has charged that the story was faked, that Mr. Broder intentionally caused his car to fail. On his Tesla blog, he released graphs and charts, based on driving logs that contest many of the details of Mr. Broder’s article.

With the logs now published, one thing is clear — Tesla’s use of predictive analytics helped them warn Broder on what is ahead. By calculating the range based on the energy consumption, Tesla signaled Broder to charge the vehicle in time. Had Tesla not been able to call its log files as witness, this futuristic motor tech company could have experienced serious brand damage.

What’s interesting is that Tesla’s story is not unique. Today, virtually anything that we use, an appliance, a mobile phone, an application, generates some sort of data – machine-generated data. And the truth exists behind that data. Such data, when analyzed and mined properly, provides indicators that solve problems, ahead of time.

Having real-time access to machine-generated data to foresee problems and improve performance is exactly why NetApp is using Pentaho. Using Hadoop and Pentaho Business Analytics to process and drive insights from 2-5 TBs of incoming data per week, NetApp has built a solution that sends alerts and notifications ahead of the actual hardware failure. The solution has helped NetApp predict its appliance interruptions for the E-Series storage units, offering new ways to exceed customer SLAs and protect the brand’s image.

Tesla, NetApp or other, if you run a data-driven business, the more your company can act on that data to improve your application, service or product performance, the better off your customers and the better your brand will be.

Pentaho Business Analytics gives companies fast and easy ways for collecting, analyzing and predicting data patterns. Pentaho’s customers see the value of analytics in many different facets and use cases. NetApp’s use case will be featured in Strata’s upcoming conference on Thursday, February 28, 2012.

Join us to find out more.

– Farnaz Erfan, Product and Solution Marketing, Pentaho

Looking to the Future of Business Analytics with Pentaho 4.8

Last week Pentaho announced Pentaho 4.8, another milestone in delivering the future of analytics. It has been an exciting ride. Our partners’ and our customers’ feedback have kept us ecstatic and ready to excel further into the future.

Pentaho 4.8 is a true testament on what the future of analytics needs. The future of analytics is driven by the data problems that businesses face every day – and is dependent on the information users and their expectations for solving those problems.

Let me give you a good example. I recently had the pleasure to meet with one of our customers – BeachMint. BeachMint is a fashion and style ecommerce company who uses celebrities / celebrity stylists to promote its retail business.

This rapidly growing online retailer needed to keep tabs on its large twitter and facebook communities to track customer sentiment and social influence. It then uses the social data to define customer cohorts and design marketing campaigns that best target each cohort.

For BeachMint insight to data is extremely important. But on one hand, the volumes and variety of data – in this case unstructured social data and click-through ad feeds – has increased its complexity. And on the other hand, the speed in which it gets created has accelerated rapidly. For example, in addition to analyzing the impact of customer sentiments on their purchasing behavior, BeachMint also needed to gain up-to-the-minute information on the activity of key promotional codes – to immediately identify those that leak out.

Pentaho understands these data challenges and user expectations. In this release Pentaho takes full advantage of its tightly coupled Data Integration and Business Analytics platform – to simplify data exploration, discovery and visualization for all users and all data types – and to deliver this information to users immediately – sometimes even at a micro-second level. In this release Pentaho delivers:

– Pentaho Mobile – the only Mobile BI application with the power to instantly create new analysis on the go.

– Pentaho Instaview – the industry’s first instant and interactive big data visualization application.

Want to find out more? Register for Pentaho 4.8 webinar and see for yourself.

– Farnaz Erfan, Product Marketing, Pentaho

Is Your Big Data Hot or Not?

Data is the most strategic asset for any business. However, massive volumes and variety of data has made catching it at the right time and right place, discovering what’s hot – and needs more attention – and what’s not, a bit trickier these days.

Heat grids are ideal for seeing a range of values in data as they provide a gradient scale, showing a change in data intensity through the use of colors. For example, you can see what’s hot in red and what’s normal in green; and everything else in various shades of color in between. Let me give you two examples of how companies have used heat grids to see if their data is hot or not:

Example #1 – A retailer is looking at week-by-week sales of a new fashion line to understand how each product line is performing as items get continually discounted throughout the season. Data is gathered from thousands of stores across the country and then entered into a heat grid graph that includes:

  • X axis – week 1 through 12, beginning from the launch of a new campaign (e.g. Nordstrom’s Summer Looks)
  • Y axis – product line (e.g. shoes, dresses, skirts, tops, accessories)
  • Color of the squares – % of discount (e.g. dark red = 70%, red = 60%, orange = 50%, yellow = 30%, green = full price)
  • Size of the squares – # of units sold

Looking at this graph, the retailer can easily see that most shoes sell at the beginning of the season – even without heavy discounts. This helps the retailer predict inventory levels to keep up with the demand for shoes.

It also shows that accessories almost never sell at regular prices, nor do they sell well when the discount levels are higher than 70%. Knowing this, the retailer can control its capital spending by not overstocking on this item. The retailer can also increase profit per square footage of their store by reselling its accessories earlier in the season to avoid high markdowns and inventory overstocks at the end of the season.

Example # 2 – A digital music streaming service provider is using analytics to assess the performance of its sales channels (direct vs. sales through different social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter) to guide future marketing and development spend. For that, the company uses a heat grid to map out:

  • X axis – various devices (iPhone, iPad, Android Smartphone, Android Tablet, Blackberry)
  • Y axis – various channels (direct site, Facebook, Twitter, …)
  • Color of the circles – # of downloads (0-100 = red, 100-1000=orange, 1000-10000 = yellow, 10000+ = green)
  • Size of the circles – app usage hours per day – the bigger the size, the more usage

This graph helps the music service provider analyze data from millions of records to quickly understand the popularity and usage patterns of their application on different devices, sold through different channels.

Heat grids can be use in variety of other forms, such as survey scales, product rating analysis, customer satisfaction studies, risk analysis and more. Are you are ready to find out whether your big data is hot or not? Check out this 3 minute video to learn how heat grids can help you.

Understanding buyers/users and their behavior is helping many companies including ideeli – one of the most popular online retailers – and Travian Games – top German MMO (massively multiplayer online) game publisher – gain better insight from their hottest asset – their big data!

What is your hottest business asset?

–          Farnaz Erfan, Product Marketing, Pentaho

This blog was originally posted on Smart Data Collective.

4 Questions to Ask Before You Define Your Cloud BI Strategy

These days, when it comes to enterprise software, it seems that it is all about the cloud. Some software applications such as Salesforce, Marketo, and Workday, have made quite a name for themselves in this space. Can Business Intelligence follow the same path to success? Does it make sense to house your BI in the cloud? I believe that it depends. Let’s explore why.

There are four criteria that impact the decision for a cloud vs. on-premise BI strategy.  Let’s take a look at how they affect your approach.

Question 1: Where is the data located?

Your BI Strategy should vary depending on the location of data.  If your data is distributed, some data may already be in the cloud, e.g. web data / clickstreams; and some on-premise, such as corporate data. For real-time or near real-time analytics, you need to deploy your BI as close to the source as possible. For example, when analyzing supply chain data out of an on-premise SAP system, where your database, application and infrastructure are all sitting on-premise, it is expensive and frankly impractical to move the data to the cloud before you start analyzing it.

Your data can also be geographically distributed. Unless your cloud infrastructure is co-located with your data geo zones, your BI experience can suffer from data latency and long refresh intervals.

Question 2: What are the security levels of data?

It’s important to acknowledge that data security levels are different in the cloud. You may not be able to put all your analytics outside of the company firewall. According to Cisco’s 2012 Global Cloud Networking survey, 72% of respondents cited data protection security as the top obstacle to a successful implementation of cloud services.

Question 3: What are the choice preferences of your users?

Customer preference is extremely important today. The balance of power has shifted, and users and customers are now the ones who decide whether an on-premise or a cloud deployment is suitable for them. What’s more, each customer’s maturity model is different. As an application provider or business process automation provider, you need to cater to your individual customers’ business needs.

Question 4: What operational SLAs does your Cloud BI vendor oblige you to?

Your operational SLAs can depend on cloud infrastructure providers, obliging you to service quality levels different from what you need. Pure cloud BI vendors provide their BI software over the public Internet through a utility pricing and delivery scheme. As much as this model provides an attractive alternative when resources are limited, it’s not for everyone. In most cases, the SaaS BI vendor depends on IaaS vendors (such as Amazon, Savvis, OpSource, etc.) for storage, hardware, and networks. As a result, the SaaS BI vendors’ operational processes have to align with the infrastructure vendors’ for housing, running, and backup/recovery of the BI software. Depending on your BI strategy, these nested and complex SLAs may or may not be the right choice.

Large enterprises, or even mid-market companies inspired by growth, typically develop an IT strategy that is provider-agnostic and has the flexibility to be hosted on-premise or in the in the cloud.   This strategy helps companies avoid lock-in and inflexibility down the road.

As cloud technology remains one of the hottest trends in IT today, it is important to assess whether cloud is the right choice for BI. The reality is that it depends. The center of gravity for BI is still on premise; however, it will move to the cloud over time mostly through the embedded BI capabilities of enterprise SaaS applications. Successful organizations will be the ones that can navigate the boundary between the two strategies and provide greater flexibility and choice by offering a product that can be deployed on-premise, in the cloud, or a hybrid of both.

What is your Business Intelligence Cloud strategy?

— Farnaz Erfan, Product Marketing, Pentaho

This blog was originally posted on Smart Data Collective.

Powered By Pentaho – Embedded Analytics in as Little as 8 Weeks

This week we announced a new program for ISV and SaaS providers called “Powered by Pentaho.” I received several questions from clients and press so I thought I would share them with you to help explain the details behind this great new offer.

What is Powered by Pentaho?

Powered by Pentaho enables Pentaho OEM partners to deliver market-leading analytics capabilities in as little as eight weeks. The new OEM program is a response to the rapid rise in Pentaho’s 2011 OEM sales bookings, which grew more than 130 percent over the same period in 2010.

What does this 8-week program entail?

Pentaho provides the training, support and integration recommendations that best fit your solution objectives. You do the development and quality assurance. Keep in mind that all throughout your development cycle and thereafter, you have access to Pentaho experts who are intimately familiar with the Pentaho architecture and APIs. The best way to picture this is to think of Pentaho’s engineering team as an extension of your own engineering team. We want you to become successful, go to market fast, and build market leadership using our business analytics.

What about Pentaho makes this possible in eight week?

Pentaho technology – We provide embedding options that require little to no development. All you need is basic HTML skills to change the look and feel of our product to match your style and branding. We refer to these options as ‘Bundled’ or ‘Mashup.’ Pentaho offers more in-depth integration level, for OEM partners that require extensions and customization. We often see our OEM partners start with a re-branding and single sign-on approach and later move to a deeper integration.

Pentaho support and training – Pentaho has built services specific to every phase of an OEM’s software development lifecycle. You can not only go to market faster, but also build your future releases, changes and modifications much easier. These services include:

  • Architecture Workshop – Learn the best practices and best integration strategies for your development approach;
  • Tailored Training – Get your engineers and support staff a solid foundation for developing and troubleshooting your solution;
  • Development Support – Get your engineering staff access to Pentaho Java developers with in-depth knowledge of Pentaho architecture to get you to market faster.

Am I the right candidate?

This program is ideal for companies with information-centric software or packaged applications that want to go to market faster with attractive and sophisticated business intelligence and data visualization capabilities. All our customers who have successfully done this in eight weeks or less have a set of common characteristics. They typically have:

  • A phased approach, usually starting with a Bundled / Mashup type embedding option;
  • Data sources that have been prepared, cleansed, and put into a business analytics / reporting format. Pentaho has tools to help you do that;
  • At least one developer – with HTML and some Java skills – staffed – who has taken part in our training and architecture workshop classes.

Does Pentaho have proof points?

To date, hundreds of ISVs and SaaS providers have become Pentaho OEM partners. Marketo is a great example. Marketo was looking for both a modern, flexible technology and a true partner to help them build a brand new business analytics product. With Pentaho they were able to go to market in just eight weeks, delivering a feature-rich product that became a new source of revenue.

We have several great resources such as white papers, webinars, OEM Partner success stories and more. Visit pentaho.com/explore/embedded-bi/ for more information.

Farnaz Erfan